[VIDEO] Inside Story – Is political Islam replacing Arab dictators?

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Secret Files Show Americans and Arabs Aided Gaddafi in Rebel Fight

Interesting report from AJE’s Jamal El Shi-yal who discovers secret Gaddafi files showing how some political circles in the US tried to help Gaddafi beat the revolution.

Despite Gaddafi’s anti-American rhetoric there is evidence the dictator maintained contact with influential US politicians and diplomats, right to the last moment before his fall.

We learn that David Welch, for example, former Assistant Secretary at the US Department of State, currently working for the reconstruction company Bechtel, advised Libyans on how to win the propaganda war and undermine the rebels. He also advised the Libyans to use the assistance of foreign intelligence services including those of Israel, Egypt, Jordan and Morocco.

According to Al Jazeera’s report, what appears to be a transcription of minutes of that meeting with Welch reads:

“Any information related to Al-Qaeda or other terrorist extremist organisations should be found and given to the American administration but only via the intelligence agencies of either Israel, Egypt, Morocco or Jordan. America will listen to them… It is better to receive this information as if it originated from those contries.”

Apart from the US’s double standard, this suggests that countries like Morocco, Egypt or Jordan, who rushed to support the NTC right after the fall of Gaddafi, had no moral constraint whatsoever dealing and working with Gaddafi should he win his ugly war against the rebellion.

Ahmed Benchemsi on Al Jazeera: “Pro-democracy supporters will boycott the poll”

In this short interview with Al Jazeera, Moroccan journalist Ahmed Benchemsi reacts to Moroccan king’s speech. Benchemsi considers that the outlines of the new Constitution as announced by the king tonight, show little progress in the way of insuring a real separation of powers. He also says the pro-democracy camp will probably boycott the poll, praising the role played by Moroccan activists on the Internet, especially a group called Mamfakinch (We Won’t Give up!) which has called for an equal share of airtime on public TV and radio during the referendum campaign between those who agree and those who disagree with the process.