The Church of Scientology in Morocco

VoxMaroc [Fr] has an astonishing piece on the adventures of the Church of Scientology in Morocco during the late 60s and early 70s. According to author and journalist Ali Amar the church tried (but later failed) to infiltrate the royal palace and have allegedly succeeded in establishing connections with senior military officials. At some point the sect may even have started training Moroccan secret agents to use E-meters to expose “politically subversive individuals.” An excerpt:

In many testimonies given in court by repentant scientologists during the major U.S. trials of the 80s and 90s, filed in California against the Church, the Moroccan operation was often mentioned. Garry Armstrong, one of Apollo’s [the name of the flagship of a flotilla that docked in various ports of the kingdom, allegedly serving as headquarters for the sect] logistical team members, will tell the court: “The idea was brilliant but adventurous as the situation in Morocco was more than tense. I personally delivered dozens of E-meters to Moroccans and participated in establishing questionnaires for interrogations. The questions were simple, they nevertheless required translation into French.” He then repeated the questions to a stunned jury: “Have you failed to denounce a traitor?”, “Have you ever pledged allegiance to Oufkir?”…

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “The Church of Scientology in Morocco

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention The Church of Scientology in Morocco « the Mirror | المرآة -- Topsy.com

  2. When you believe in flying horses and sticks that turn into snakes, you’re a good candidate for the e-meter scam.

  3. @fawzi:

    Well the average Moroccan interrogator at that period was typically brutish, stupid, most probably a heavy drinker, an ignorant in matters of religion and in pretty much anything else. If indeed they adopted the scam it must have been because they were ordered to by a hierarchy that, you’re right, is much more “vulnerable” to this kind of crazy stuff.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s